Daily Archive: November 13, 2016

Your Computer Might Start Cooking for You

Don’t let that headline spook you. Recall the Jetson’s had a computer that provided all their meals? And, there have been countless other movies and shows that insist we will eventually be served by artificial intelligence (AI). In fact, in 1969 Neiman-Marcus advertised a $10,600 kitchen computer manufactured by Honeywell. It was a joke, but some people took it seriously.

Computers are essential to life. You can hardly find a job if you don’t know how to utilize a number of different pieces of software. So, when it comes to computers, it makes sense that you would use a guide on the best speakers for your computer. Obviously, you want your cooking shows to be audible. In fact, you might want your computer to read the recipes to you. So, good speakers are imperative. You’ll eventually have to determine the value in an included subwoofer for those purposes.

Your Computer Might Start Cooking for You

The History of Computers and Cooking

It took another 20 years before anyone could boast about a computer in the kitchen. Up until then, the best thing computers could do is provide you with a glorified recipe box. They offered spreadsheets to keep track of your favorite meals. However, in 1989, something else happened. Learn more.

The Culinary Institute of America’s St. Andrews Café, located in Hyde Park, NY, and is credited with that newfangled computer capability. They were proud to announce that they had the first commercial computer capable of calculating a meal’s nutritional data. At the end of a customer’s meal, they were able to provide a printout that illuminated the nutrient analysis. If you were lucky, you discovered that you had enjoyed a meal that was nutritious as well.

The World Wide Web

The Internet was the true initiator of the computer cooking revolution though. Prior to that, CD-ROMs rife with cooking shows, was the closest thing to cooking computerization. But, they were about to lose their value. This occurred when Epicurious launched in 1995. Impressively, it is still one of the favorite recipe databases available.

A California-based company, Digital Chef, is one of the earliest companies to offer streaming video. They also provided their users with a unique option. They could scale their recipes by inputting the number of diners they were expecting to feed. Sadly, most users didn’t have the bandwidth necessary to actually use the videos and the company closed pretty quickly.

Touch Screens

Electrolux took the next conceivable step by creating the Screenfridge. They assumed that customers would eventually want computers in their refrigerators. This 1999 invention provided the potential to order food, add video memos, or look at recipes through the fridge’s touchscreen. Read more.

3Com, created the truly kitchen based computer, the Ergo Audrey. It wasn’t a cooking computer, but it did recognize the kitchen as the hub of the family. Email, web browsing, and recipe research could all be done from the comfort of that kitchen centered computer.

The Real Cooking Computer

We’ve taken you through the history, and now it’s time to reveal the true cooking computer. IBM has created Chef Watson. This AI is capable of cooking food based on your specified ingredients. It cooked a meal for Leo Benedictus based on four ingredients: chicken livers, Greek yogurt, tequila, and wasabi. Benedictus admits that humans have served him worse food. Read the whole article right here. Computers have come a long way. It will be interesting to see where they take us in the culinary realm.